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AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

dream one of his favorite waking dreams, the one about becoming a great 

half-back, or the one about the Japanese invasion, when he was rewarded 

by being made the youngest general in the world. It was always 

the becoming he dreamed of, never the being. This, too, was quite 

characteristic of Amory. 

 

***** 

 

CODE OF THE YOUNG EGOTIST 

 

Before he was summoned back to Lake Geneva, he had appeared, shy but 

inwardly glowing, in his first long trousers, set off by a purple 

accordion tie and a "Belmont" collar with the edges unassailably 

meeting, purple socks, and handkerchief with a purple border peeping 

from his breast pocket. But more than that, he had formulated his first 

philosophy, a code to live by, which, as near as it can be named, was a 

sort of aristocratic egotism. 

 

He had realized that his best interests were bound up with those of a 

certain variant, changing person, whose label, in order that his past 

might always be identified with him, was Amory Blaine. Amory marked 

himself a fortunate youth, capable of infinite expansion for good or 

evil. He did not consider himself a "strong char'c'ter," but relied on 

his facility (learn things sorta quick) and his superior mentality (read 

a lotta deep books). He was proud of the fact that he could never 

become a mechanical or scientific genius. From no other heights was he 

debarred. 

 

Physically.--Amory thought that he was exceedingly handsome. He was. He 

fancied himself an athlete of possibilities and a supple dancer. 

 

Socially.--Here his condition was, perhaps, most dangerous. He granted 

himself personality, charm, magnetism, poise, the power of dominating 

all contemporary males, the gift of fascinating all women. 

 

Mentally.--Complete, unquestioned superiority. 

 

Now a confession will have to be made. Amory had rather a Puritan 

conscience. Not that he yielded to it--later in life he almost 

completely slew it--but at fifteen it made him consider himself a 

great deal worse than other boys... unscrupulousness... the desire 

to influence people in almost every way, even for evil... a certain 


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