Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

 

"But, my dear boy, what odd clothes! They look as if they were a 

_set_--don't they? Is your underwear purple, too?" 

 

Amory grunted impolitely. 

 

"You must go to Brooks' and get some really nice suits. Oh, we'll have a 

talk to-night or perhaps to-morrow night. I want to tell you about 

your heart--you've probably been neglecting your heart--and you don't 

_know_." 

 

Amory thought how superficial was the recent overlay of his own 

generation. Aside from a minute shyness, he felt that the old cynical 

kinship with his mother had not been one bit broken. Yet for the first 

few days he wandered about the gardens and along the shore in a state 

of superloneliness, finding a lethargic content in smoking "Bull" at the 

garage with one of the chauffeurs. 

 

The sixty acres of the estate were dotted with old and new summer houses 

and many fountains and white benches that came suddenly into sight from 

foliage-hung hiding-places; there was a great and constantly increasing 

family of white cats that prowled the many flower-beds and were 

silhouetted suddenly at night against the darkening trees. It was on 

one of the shadowy paths that Beatrice at last captured Amory, after Mr. 

Blaine had, as usual, retired for the evening to his private library. 

After reproving him for avoiding her, she took him for a long 

tete-a-tete in the moonlight. He could not reconcile himself to her 

beauty, that was mother to his own, the exquisite neck and shoulders, 

the grace of a fortunate woman of thirty. 

 

"Amory, dear," she crooned softly, "I had such a strange, weird time 

after I left you." 

 

"Did you, Beatrice?" 

 

"When I had my last breakdown"--she spoke of it as a sturdy, gallant 

feat. 

 

"The doctors told me"--her voice sang on a confidential note--"that if 

any man alive had done the consistent drinking that I have, he would 

have been physically _shattered_, my dear, and in his _grave_--long in 

his grave." 

 

Amory winced, and wondered how this would have sounded to Froggy Parker. 

 

"Yes," continued Beatrice tragically, "I had dreams--wonderful visions." 

She pressed the palms of her hands into her eyes. "I saw bronze rivers 


Page 16 from 30:  Back   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15  [16]  17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   Forward