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AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

Not for a second do I regret being American--indeed, I think that a 

regret typical of very vulgar people, and I feel sure we are the great 

coming nation--yet"--and she sighed--"I feel my life should have drowsed 

away close to an older, mellower civilization, a land of greens and 

autumnal browns--" 

 

Amory did not answer, so his mother continued: 

 

"My regret is that you haven't been abroad, but still, as you are a man, 

it's better that you should grow up here under the snarling eagle--is 

that the right term?" 

 

Amory agreed that it was. She would not have appreciated the Japanese 

invasion. 

 

"When do I go to school?" 

 

"Next month. You'll have to start East a little early to take your 

examinations. After that you'll have a free week, so I want you to go up 

the Hudson and pay a visit." 

 

"To who?" 

 

"To Monsignor Darcy, Amory. He wants to see you. He went to Harrow and 

then to Yale--became a Catholic. I want him to talk to you--I feel he 

can be such a help--" She stroked his auburn hair gently. "Dear Amory, 

dear Amory--" 

 

"Dear Beatrice--" 

 

***** 

 

So early in September Amory, provided with "six suits summer underwear, 

six suits winter underwear, one sweater or T shirt, one jersey, one 

overcoat, winter, etc.," set out for New England, the land of schools. 

 

There were Andover and Exeter with their memories of New England 

dead--large, college-like democracies; St. Mark's, Groton, St. 

Regis'--recruited from Boston and the Knickerbocker families of New 

York; St. Paul's, with its great rinks; Pomfret and St. George's, 

prosperous and well-dressed; Taft and Hotchkiss, which prepared 

the wealth of the Middle West for social success at Yale; Pawling, 

Westminster, Choate, Kent, and a hundred others; all milling out their 

well-set-up, conventional, impressive type, year after year; their 

mental stimulus the college entrance exams; their vague purpose set 

forth in a hundred circulars as "To impart a Thorough Mental, Moral, and 

Physical Training as a Christian Gentleman, to fit the boy for meeting 

the problems of his day and generation, and to give a solid foundation 


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