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AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

in the Arts and Sciences." 

 

At St. Regis' Amory stayed three days and took his exams with a scoffing 

confidence, then doubling back to New York to pay his tutelary visit. 

The metropolis, barely glimpsed, made little impression on him, except 

for the sense of cleanliness he drew from the tall white buildings seen 

from a Hudson River steamboat in the early morning. Indeed, his mind was 

so crowded with dreams of athletic prowess at school that he considered 

this visit only as a rather tiresome prelude to the great adventure. 

This, however, it did not prove to be. 

 

Monsignor Darcy's house was an ancient, rambling structure set on a hill 

overlooking the river, and there lived its owner, between his trips to 

all parts of the Roman-Catholic world, rather like an exiled Stuart king 

waiting to be called to the rule of his land. Monsignor was forty-four 

then, and bustling--a trifle too stout for symmetry, with hair the color 

of spun gold, and a brilliant, enveloping personality. When he came into 

a room clad in his full purple regalia from thatch to toe, he resembled 

a Turner sunset, and attracted both admiration and attention. He had 

written two novels: one of them violently anti-Catholic, just before his 

conversion, and five years later another, in which he had attempted 

to turn all his clever jibes against Catholics into even cleverer 

innuendoes against Episcopalians. He was intensely ritualistic, 

startlingly dramatic, loved the idea of God enough to be a celibate, and 

rather liked his neighbor. 

 

Children adored him because he was like a child; youth revelled in his 

company because he was still a youth, and couldn't be shocked. In the 

proper land and century he might have been a Richelieu--at present he 

was a very moral, very religious (if not particularly pious) clergyman, 

making a great mystery about pulling rusty wires, and appreciating life 

to the fullest, if not entirely enjoying it. 

 

He and Amory took to each other at first sight--the jovial, impressive 

prelate who could dazzle an embassy ball, and the green-eyed, intent 


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