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Table of contents
AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

youth, in his first long trousers, accepted in their own minds a 

relation of father and son within a half-hour's conversation. 

 

"My dear boy, I've been waiting to see you for years. Take a big chair 

and we'll have a chat." 

 

"I've just come from school--St. Regis's, you know." 

 

"So your mother says--a remarkable woman; have a cigarette--I'm sure 

you smoke. Well, if you're like me, you loathe all science and 

mathematics--" 

 

Amory nodded vehemently. 

 

"Hate 'em all. Like English and history." 

 

"Of course. You'll hate school for a while, too, but I'm glad you're 

going to St. Regis's." 

 

"Why?" 

 

"Because it's a gentleman's school, and democracy won't hit you so 

early. You'll find plenty of that in college." 

 

"I want to go to Princeton," said Amory. "I don't know why, but I think 

of all Harvard men as sissies, like I used to be, and all Yale men as 

wearing big blue sweaters and smoking pipes." 

 

Monsignor chuckled. 

 

"I'm one, you know." 

 

"Oh, you're different--I think of Princeton as being lazy and 

good-looking and aristocratic--you know, like a spring day. Harvard 

seems sort of indoors--" 

 

"And Yale is November, crisp and energetic," finished Monsignor. 

 

"That's it." 

 

They slipped briskly into an intimacy from which they never recovered. 

 

"I was for Bonnie Prince Charlie," announced Amory. 

 

"Of course you were--and for Hannibal--" 

 

"Yes, and for the Southern Confederacy." He was rather sceptical about 

being an Irish patriot--he suspected that being Irish was being somewhat 

common--but Monsignor assured him that Ireland was a romantic lost cause 

and Irish people quite charming, and that it should, by all means, be 

one of his principal biasses. 

 

After a crowded hour which included several more cigarettes, and during 

which Monsignor learned, to his surprise but not to his horror, that 

Amory had not been brought up a Catholic, he announced that he had 

another guest. This turned out to be the Honorable Thornton Hancock, of 

Boston, ex-minister to The Hague, author of an erudite history of the 


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