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Table of contents
AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

Middle Ages and the last of a distinguished, patriotic, and brilliant 

family. 

 

"He comes here for a rest," said Monsignor confidentially, treating 

Amory as a contemporary. "I act as an escape from the weariness of 

agnosticism, and I think I'm the only man who knows how his staid old 

mind is really at sea and longs for a sturdy spar like the Church to 

cling to." 

 

Their first luncheon was one of the memorable events of Amory's early 

life. He was quite radiant and gave off a peculiar brightness and 

charm. Monsignor called out the best that he had thought by question and 

suggestion, and Amory talked with an ingenious brilliance of a thousand 

impulses and desires and repulsions and faiths and fears. He and 

Monsignor held the floor, and the older man, with his less receptive, 

less accepting, yet certainly not colder mentality, seemed content to 

listen and bask in the mellow sunshine that played between these two. 

Monsignor gave the effect of sunlight to many people; Amory gave it in 

his youth and, to some extent, when he was very much older, but never 

again was it quite so mutually spontaneous. 

 

"He's a radiant boy," thought Thornton Hancock, who had seen the 

splendor of two continents and talked with Parnell and Gladstone and 

Bismarck--and afterward he added to Monsignor: "But his education ought 

not to be intrusted to a school or college." 

 

But for the next four years the best of Amory's intellect was 

concentrated on matters of popularity, the intricacies of a university 

social system and American Society as represented by Biltmore Teas and 

Hot Springs golf-links. 

 

... In all, a wonderful week, that saw Amory's mind turned inside out, a 

hundred of his theories confirmed, and his joy of life crystallized to 

a thousand ambitions. Not that the conversation was scholastic--heaven 

forbid! Amory had only the vaguest idea as to what Bernard Shaw was--but 

Monsignor made quite as much out of "The Beloved Vagabond" and "Sir 

Nigel," taking good care that Amory never once felt out of his depth. 

 

But the trumpets were sounding for Amory's preliminary skirmish with his 


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