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AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

squad; it pleased him when Doctor Dougall told him at the end of a 

heated conference that he could, if he wished, get the best marks in 

school. But Doctor Dougall was wrong. It was temperamentally impossible 

for Amory to get the best marks in school. 

 

Miserable, confined to bounds, unpopular with both faculty and 

students--that was Amory's first term. But at Christmas he had returned 

to Minneapolis, tight-lipped and strangely jubilant. 

 

"Oh, I was sort of fresh at first," he told Frog Parker patronizingly, 

"but I got along fine--lightest man on the squad. You ought to go away 

to school, Froggy. It's great stuff." 

 

***** 

 

INCIDENT OF THE WELL-MEANING PROFESSOR 

 

On the last night of his first term, Mr. Margotson, the senior master, 

sent word to study hall that Amory was to come to his room at nine. 

Amory suspected that advice was forthcoming, but he determined to be 

courteous, because this Mr. Margotson had been kindly disposed toward 

him. 

 

His summoner received him gravely, and motioned him to a chair. He 

hemmed several times and looked consciously kind, as a man will when he 

knows he's on delicate ground. 

 

"Amory," he began. "I've sent for you on a personal matter." 

 

"Yes, sir." 

 

"I've noticed you this year and I--I like you. I think you have in you 

the makings of a--a very good man." 

 

"Yes, sir," Amory managed to articulate. He hated having people talk as 

if he were an admitted failure. 

 

"But I've noticed," continued the older man blindly, "that you're not 

very popular with the boys." 

 

"No, sir." Amory licked his lips. 

 

"Ah--I thought you might not understand exactly what it 

was they--ah--objected to. I'm going to tell you, because I 

believe--ah--that when a boy knows his difficulties he's better able to 

cope with them--to conform to what others expect of him." He a-hemmed 

again with delicate reticence, and continued: "They seem to think that 

you're--ah--rather too fresh--" 

 

Amory could stand no more. He rose from his chair, scarcely controlling 

his voice when he spoke. 

 

"I know--oh, _don't_ you s'pose I know." His voice rose. "I know what 


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