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Table of contents
AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

stammering, yet evidently washed his hands, was rather a treat. 

 

"Ever read any Oscar Wilde?" he asked. 

 

"No. Who wrote it?" 

 

"It's a man--don't you know?" 

 

"Oh, surely." A faint chord was struck in Amory's memory. "Wasn't the 

comic opera, 'Patience,' written about him?" 

 

"Yes, that's the fella. I've just finished a book of his, 'The Picture 

of Dorian Gray,' and I certainly wish you'd read it. You'd like it. You 

can borrow it if you want to." 

 

"Why, I'd like it a lot--thanks." 

 

"Don't you want to come up to the room? I've got a few other books." 

 

Amory hesitated, glanced at the St. Paul's group--one of them was the 

magnificent, exquisite Humbird--and he considered how determinate the 

addition of this friend would be. He never got to the stage of making 

them and getting rid of them--he was not hard enough for that--so he 

measured Thomas Parke D'Invilliers' undoubted attractions and value 

against the menace of cold eyes behind tortoise-rimmed spectacles that 

he fancied glared from the next table. 

 

"Yes, I'll go." 

 

So he found "Dorian Gray" and the "Mystic and Somber Dolores" and the 

"Belle Dame sans Merci"; for a month was keen on naught else. The world 

became pale and interesting, and he tried hard to look at Princeton 

through the satiated eyes of Oscar Wilde and Swinburne--or "Fingal 

O'Flaherty" and "Algernon Charles," as he called them in precieuse jest. 

He read enormously every night--Shaw, Chesterton, Barrie, Pinero, Yeats, 

Synge, Ernest Dowson, Arthur Symons, Keats, Sudermann, Robert Hugh 

Benson, the Savoy Operas--just a heterogeneous mixture, for he suddenly 

discovered that he had read nothing for years. 

 

Tom D'Invilliers became at first an occasion rather than a friend. Amory 

saw him about once a week, and together they gilded the ceiling of 

Tom's room and decorated the walls with imitation tapestry, bought at 

an auction, tall candlesticks and figured curtains. Amory liked him for 

being clever and literary without effeminacy or affectation. In fact, 

Amory did most of the strutting and tried painfully to make every remark 


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