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AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

Soft and stung softly--fairer for a fleck..." 

 

"That's good," Kerry would say softly. "It pleases the elder Holiday. 

That's a great poet, I guess." Tom, delighted at an audience, would 

ramble through the "Poems and Ballades" until Kerry and Amory knew them 

almost as well as he. 

 

Amory took to writing poetry on spring afternoons, in the gardens of the 

big estates near Princeton, while swans made effective atmosphere in the 

artificial pools, and slow clouds sailed harmoniously above the willows. 

May came too soon, and suddenly unable to bear walls, he wandered the 

campus at all hours through starlight and rain. 

 

***** 

 

A DAMP SYMBOLIC INTERLUDE 

 

The night mist fell. From the moon it rolled, clustered about the spires 

and towers, and then settled below them, so that the dreaming peaks were 

still in lofty aspiration toward the sky. Figures that dotted the 

day like ants now brushed along as shadowy ghosts, in and out of 

the foreground. The Gothic halls and cloisters were infinitely more 

mysterious as they loomed suddenly out of the darkness, outlined each by 

myriad faint squares of yellow light. Indefinitely from somewhere a bell 

boomed the quarter-hour, and Amory, pausing by the sun-dial, stretched 

himself out full length on the damp grass. The cool bathed his eyes and 

slowed the flight of time--time that had crept so insidiously through 

the lazy April afternoons, seemed so intangible in the long spring 

twilights. Evening after evening the senior singing had drifted over the 

campus in melancholy beauty, and through the shell of his undergraduate 

consciousness had broken a deep and reverent devotion to the gray walls 

and Gothic peaks and all they symbolized as warehouses of dead ages. 

 

The tower that in view of his window sprang upward, grew into a spire, 

yearning higher until its uppermost tip was half invisible against 

the morning skies, gave him the first sense of the transiency and 

unimportance of the campus figures except as holders of the apostolic 

succession. He liked knowing that Gothic architecture, with its upward 


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