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Table of contents
AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

 

How a Triangle show ever got off was a mystery, but it was a riotous 

mystery, anyway, whether or not one did enough service to wear a little 

gold Triangle on his watch-chain. "Ha-Ha Hortense!" was written over 

six times and had the names of nine collaborators on the programme. All 

Triangle shows started by being "something different--not just a regular 

musical comedy," but when the several authors, the president, the coach 

and the faculty committee finished with it, there remained just the old 

reliable Triangle show with the old reliable jokes and the star comedian 

who got expelled or sick or something just before the trip, and the 

dark-whiskered man in the pony-ballet, who "absolutely won't shave twice 

a day, doggone it!" 

 

There was one brilliant place in "Ha-Ha Hortense!" It is a Princeton 

tradition that whenever a Yale man who is a member of the widely 

advertised "Skull and Bones" hears the sacred name mentioned, he must 

leave the room. It is also a tradition that the members are invariably 

successful in later life, amassing fortunes or votes or coupons or 

whatever they choose to amass. Therefore, at each performance of "Ha-Ha 

Hortense!" half-a-dozen seats were kept from sale and occupied by six 

of the worst-looking vagabonds that could be hired from the streets, 

further touched up by the Triangle make-up man. At the moment in the 

show where Firebrand, the Pirate Chief, pointed at his black flag and 

said, "I am a Yale graduate--note my Skull and Bones!"--at this very 

moment the six vagabonds were instructed to rise _conspicuously_ and 

leave the theatre with looks of deep melancholy and an injured dignity. 

It was claimed though never proved that on one occasion the hired Elis 

were swelled by one of the real thing. 

 

They played through vacation to the fashionable of eight cities. Amory 

liked Louisville and Memphis best: these knew how to meet strangers, 

furnished extraordinary punch, and flaunted an astonishing array 

of feminine beauty. Chicago he approved for a certain verve that 

transcended its loud accent--however, it was a Yale town, and as the 


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