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AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

Yale Glee Club was expected in a week the Triangle received only divided 

homage. In Baltimore, Princeton was at home, and every one fell in love. 

There was a proper consumption of strong waters all along the line; one 

man invariably went on the stage highly stimulated, claiming that his 

particular interpretation of the part required it. There were three 

private cars; however, no one slept except in the third car, which 

was called the "animal car," and where were herded the spectacled 

wind-jammers of the orchestra. Everything was so hurried that there 

was no time to be bored, but when they arrived in Philadelphia, with 

vacation nearly over, there was rest in getting out of the heavy 

atmosphere of flowers and grease-paint, and the ponies took off their 

corsets with abdominal pains and sighs of relief. 

 

When the disbanding came, Amory set out post haste for Minneapolis, for 

Sally Weatherby's cousin, Isabelle Borge, was coming to spend the winter 

in Minneapolis while her parents went abroad. He remembered Isabelle 

only as a little girl with whom he had played sometimes when he first 

went to Minneapolis. She had gone to Baltimore to live--but since then 

she had developed a past. 

 

Amory was in full stride, confident, nervous, and jubilant. Scurrying 

back to Minneapolis to see a girl he had known as a child seemed the 

interesting and romantic thing to do, so without compunction he wired 

his mother not to expect him... sat in the train, and thought about 

himself for thirty-six hours. 

 

***** 

 

"PETTING" 

 

On the Triangle trip Amory had come into constant contact with that 

great current American phenomenon, the "petting party." 

 

None of the Victorian mothers--and most of the mothers were 

Victorian--had any idea how casually their daughters were accustomed to 

be kissed. "Servant-girls are that way," says Mrs. Huston-Carmelite to 

her popular daughter. "They are kissed first and proposed to afterward." 

 

But the Popular Daughter becomes engaged every six months between 

sixteen and twenty-two, when she arranges a match with young Hambell, of 


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