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AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

 

As she crept in bed she wondered what he'd say in his special delivery 

to-morrow. He had such a good-looking mouth--would she ever--? 

 

"Fourteen angels were watching o'er them," sang Sally sleepily from the 

next room. 

 

"Damn!" muttered Isabelle, punching the pillow into a luxurious lump and 

exploring the cold sheets cautiously. "Damn!" 

 

***** 

 

CARNIVAL 

 

Amory, by way of the Princetonian, had arrived. The minor snobs, finely 

balanced thermometers of success, warmed to him as the club elections 

grew nigh, and he and Tom were visited by groups of upper classmen who 

arrived awkwardly, balanced on the edge of the furniture and talked of 

all subjects except the one of absorbing interest. Amory was amused at 

the intent eyes upon him, and, in case the visitors represented some 

club in which he was not interested, took great pleasure in shocking 

them with unorthodox remarks. 

 

"Oh, let me see--" he said one night to a flabbergasted delegation, 

"what club do you represent?" 

 

With visitors from Ivy and Cottage and Tiger Inn he played the "nice, 

unspoilt, ingenuous boy" very much at ease and quite unaware of the 

object of the call. 

 

When the fatal morning arrived, early in March, and the campus became 

a document in hysteria, he slid smoothly into Cottage with Alec Connage 

and watched his suddenly neurotic class with much wonder. 

 

There were fickle groups that jumped from club to club; there were 

friends of two or three days who announced tearfully and wildly that 

they must join the same club, nothing should separate them; there were 

snarling disclosures of long-hidden grudges as the Suddenly Prominent 

remembered snubs of freshman year. Unknown men were elevated into 

importance when they received certain coveted bids; others who were 

considered "all set" found that they had made unexpected enemies, felt 

themselves stranded and deserted, talked wildly of leaving college. 

 

In his own crowd Amory saw men kept out for wearing green hats, for 

being "a damn tailor's dummy," for having "too much pull in heaven," 

for getting drunk one night "not like a gentleman, by God," or for 


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