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Table of contents
AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

to "cultivate" him. Servants worshipped him, and treated him like a god. 

He seemed the eternal example of what the upper class tries to be. 

 

"He's like those pictures in the Illustrated London News of the English 

officers who have been killed," Amory had said to Alec. "Well," Alec 

had answered, "if you want to know the shocking truth, his father was a 

grocery clerk who made a fortune in Tacoma real estate and came to New 

York ten years ago." 

 

Amory had felt a curious sinking sensation. 

 

This present type of party was made possible by the surging together of 

the class after club elections--as if to make a last desperate attempt 

to know itself, to keep together, to fight off the tightening spirit of 

the clubs. It was a let-down from the conventional heights they had all 

walked so rigidly. 

 

After supper they saw Kaluka to the boardwalk, and then strolled back 

along the beach to Asbury. The evening sea was a new sensation, for all 

its color and mellow age was gone, and it seemed the bleak waste that 

made the Norse sagas sad; Amory thought of Kipling's 

 

"Beaches of Lukanon before the sealers came." 

 

 

It was still a music, though, infinitely sorrowful. 

 

Ten o'clock found them penniless. They had suppered greatly on their 

last eleven cents and, singing, strolled up through the casinos and 

lighted arches on the boardwalk, stopping to listen approvingly to all 

band concerts. In one place Kerry took up a collection for the French 

War Orphans which netted a dollar and twenty cents, and with this they 

bought some brandy in case they caught cold in the night. They finished 

the day in a moving-picture show and went into solemn systematic roars 

of laughter at an ancient comedy, to the startled annoyance of the rest 

of the audience. Their entrance was distinctly strategic, for each man 

as he entered pointed reproachfully at the one just behind him. Sloane, 

bringing up the rear, disclaimed all knowledge and responsibility as 

soon as the others were scattered inside; then as the irate ticket-taker 

rushed in he followed nonchalantly. 


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