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AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

of triumph--and then the procession passed through shadowy Campbell 

Arch, and the voices grew fainter as it wound eastward over the campus. 

 

The minutes passed and Amory sat there very quietly. He regretted the 

rule that would forbid freshmen to be outdoors after curfew, for he 

wanted to ramble through the shadowy scented lanes, where Witherspoon 

brooded like a dark mother over Whig and Clio, her Attic children, where 

the black Gothic snake of Little curled down to Cuyler and Patton, these 

in turn flinging the mystery out over the placid slope rolling to the 

lake. 

 

***** 

 

Princeton of the daytime filtered slowly into his consciousness--West 

and Reunion, redolent of the sixties, Seventy-nine Hall, brick-red and 

arrogant, Upper and Lower Pyne, aristocratic Elizabethan ladies not 

quite content to live among shopkeepers, and, topping all, climbing with 

clear blue aspiration, the great dreaming spires of Holder and Cleveland 

towers. 

 

From the first he loved Princeton--its lazy beauty, its half-grasped 

significance, the wild moonlight revel of the rushes, the handsome, 

prosperous big-game crowds, and under it all the air of struggle that 

pervaded his class. From the day when, wild-eyed and exhausted, the 

jerseyed freshmen sat in the gymnasium and elected some one from Hill 

School class president, a Lawrenceville celebrity vice-president, a 

hockey star from St. Paul's secretary, up until the end of sophomore 

year it never ceased, that breathless social system, that worship, 

seldom named, never really admitted, of the bogey "Big Man." 

 

First it was schools, and Amory, alone from St. Regis', watched the 

crowds form and widen and form again; St. Paul's, Hill, Pomfret, eating 

at certain tacitly reserved tables in Commons, dressing in their own 

corners of the gymnasium, and drawing unconsciously about them a barrier 

of the slightly less important but socially ambitious to protect them 

from the friendly, rather puzzled high-school element. From the 

moment he realized this Amory resented social barriers as artificial 


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