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AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

 

Amory was far from contented. He missed the place he had won at St. 

Regis', the being known and admired, yet Princeton stimulated him, and 

there were many things ahead calculated to arouse the Machiavelli latent 

in him, could he but insert a wedge. The upper-class clubs, concerning 

which he had pumped a reluctant graduate during the previous summer, 

excited his curiosity: Ivy, detached and breathlessly aristocratic; 

Cottage, an impressive milange of brilliant adventurers and well-dressed 

philanderers; Tiger Inn, broad-shouldered and athletic, vitalized by 

an honest elaboration of prep-school standards; Cap and Gown, 

anti-alcoholic, faintly religious and politically powerful; flamboyant 

Colonial; literary Quadrangle; and the dozen others, varying in age and 

position. 

 

Anything which brought an under classman into too glaring a light was 

labelled with the damning brand of "running it out." The movies thrived 

on caustic comments, but the men who made them were generally running 

it out; talking of clubs was running it out; standing for anything 

very strongly, as, for instance, drinking parties or teetotalling, 

was running it out; in short, being personally conspicuous was not 

tolerated, and the influential man was the non-committal man, until at 

club elections in sophomore year every one should be sewed up in some 

bag for the rest of his college career. 

 

Amory found that writing for the Nassau Literary Magazine would get him 

nothing, but that being on the board of the Daily Princetonian would 

get any one a good deal. His vague desire to do immortal acting with 

the English Dramatic Association faded out when he found that the most 

ingenious brains and talents were concentrated upon the Triangle Club, a 

musical comedy organization that every year took a great Christmas trip. 

In the meanwhile, feeling strangely alone and restless in Commons, with 

new desires and ambitions stirring in his mind, he let the first term go 

by between an envy of the embryo successes and a puzzled fretting with 

Kerry as to why they were not accepted immediately among the elite of 


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