Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

 

The undergraduate body itself was rather more interesting that year than 

had been the entirely Philistine Princeton of two years before. Things 

had livened surprisingly, though at the sacrifice of much of the 

spontaneous charm of freshman year. In the old Princeton they would 

never have discovered Tanaduke Wylie. Tanaduke was a sophomore, with 

tremendous ears and a way of saying, "The earth swirls down through 

the ominous moons of preconsidered generations!" that made them vaguely 

wonder why it did not sound quite clear, but never question that it was 

the utterance of a supersoul. At least so Tom and Amory took him. They 

told him in all earnestness that he had a mind like Shelley's, and 

featured his ultrafree free verse and prose poetry in the Nassau 

Literary Magazine. But Tanaduke's genius absorbed the many colors of the 

age, and he took to the Bohemian life, to their great disappointment. He 

talked of Greenwich Village now instead of "noon-swirled moons," and 

met winter muses, unacademic, and cloistered by Forty-second Street 

and Broadway, instead of the Shelleyan dream-children with whom he had 

regaled their expectant appreciation. So they surrendered Tanaduke to 

the futurists, deciding that he and his flaming ties would do better 

there. Tom gave him the final advice that he should stop writing for two 

years and read the complete works of Alexander Pope four times, but on 

Amory's suggestion that Pope for Tanaduke was like foot-ease for stomach 

trouble, they withdrew in laughter, and called it a coin's toss whether 

this genius was too big or too petty for them. 

 

Amory rather scornfully avoided the popular professors who dispensed 

easy epigrams and thimblefuls of Chartreuse to groups of admirers every 

night. He was disappointed, too, at the air of general uncertainty on 

every subject that seemed linked with the pedantic temperament; his 

opinions took shape in a miniature satire called "In a Lecture-Room," 

which he persuaded Tom to print in the Nassau Lit. 

 

 

"Good-morning, Fool... 


Page 15 from 26:  Back   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14  [15]  16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   Forward