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Table of contents
AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

and shivered against the cloud of fog that drifted in over him. The two 

hours' ride were like days, and he nearly cried aloud with joy when the 

towers of Princeton loomed up beside him and the yellow squares of light 

filtered through the blue rain. 

 

Tom was standing in the centre of the room, pensively relighting a 

cigar-stub. Amory fancied he looked rather relieved on seeing him. 

 

"Had a hell of a dream about you last night," came in the cracked voice 

through the cigar smoke. "I had an idea you were in some trouble." 

 

"Don't tell me about it!" Amory almost shrieked. "Don't say a word; I'm 

tired and pepped out." 

 

Tom looked at him queerly and then sank into a chair and opened his 

Italian note-book. Amory threw his coat and hat on the floor, loosened 

his collar, and took a Wells novel at random from the shelf. "Wells is 

sane," he thought, "and if he won't do I'll read Rupert Brooke." 

 

Half an hour passed. Outside the wind came up, and Amory started as 

the wet branches moved and clawed with their finger-nails at the 

window-pane. Tom was deep in his work, and inside the room only the 

occasional scratch of a match or the rustle of leather as they shifted 

in their chairs broke the stillness. Then like a zigzag of lightning 

came the change. Amory sat bolt upright, frozen cold in his chair. Tom 

was looking at him with his mouth drooping, eyes fixed. 

 

"God help us!" Amory cried. 

 

"Oh, my heavens!" shouted Tom, "look behind!" Quick as a flash Amory 

whirled around. He saw nothing but the dark window-pane. "It's gone 

now," came Tom's voice after a second in a still terror. "Something was 

looking at you." 

 

Trembling violently, Amory dropped into his chair again. 

 

"I've got to tell you," he said. "I've had one hell of an experience. 

I think I've--I've seen the devil or--something like him. What face did 

you just see?--or no," he added quickly, "don't tell me!" 

 

And he gave Tom the story. It was midnight when he finished, and after 

that, with all lights burning, two sleepy, shivering boys read to each 


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