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AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

fundamental Amory, idle, imaginative, rebellious, had been nearly snowed 

under. He had conformed, he had succeeded, but as his imagination was 

neither satisfied nor grasped by his own success, he had listlessly, 

half-accidentally chucked the whole thing and become again: 

 

6. The fundamental Amory. 

 

***** 

 

FINANCIAL 

 

His father died quietly and inconspicuously at Thanksgiving. The 

incongruity of death with either the beauties of Lake Geneva or with his 

mother's dignified, reticent attitude diverted him, and he looked at the 

funeral with an amused tolerance. He decided that burial was after all 

preferable to cremation, and he smiled at his old boyhood choice, 

slow oxidation in the top of a tree. The day after the ceremony he 

was amusing himself in the great library by sinking back on a couch in 

graceful mortuary attitudes, trying to determine whether he would, when 

his day came, be found with his arms crossed piously over his chest 

(Monsignor Darcy had once advocated this posture as being the most 

distinguished), or with his hands clasped behind his head, a more pagan 

and Byronic attitude. 

 

What interested him much more than the final departure of his father 

from things mundane was a tri-cornered conversation between Beatrice, 

Mr. Barton, of Barton and Krogman, their lawyers, and himself, that took 

place several days after the funeral. For the first time he came into 

actual cognizance of the family finances, and realized what a tidy 

fortune had once been under his father's management. He took a 

ledger labelled "1906" and ran through it rather carefully. The total 

expenditure that year had come to something over one hundred and ten 

thousand dollars. Forty thousand of this had been Beatrice's own income, 

and there had been no attempt to account for it: it was all under the 

heading, "Drafts, checks, and letters of credit forwarded to Beatrice 

Blaine." The dispersal of the rest was rather minutely itemized: the 

taxes and improvements on the Lake Geneva estate had come to almost nine 

thousand dollars; the general up-keep, including Beatrice's electric and 


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