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Table of contents
AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

joint means of combating it." 

 

"Well, what's the idea of the thing?" 

 

"Oh, clubs injurious to Princeton democracy; cost a lot; draw social 

lines, take time; the regular line you get sometimes from disappointed 

sophomores. Woodrow thought they should be abolished and all that." 

 

"But this is the real thing?" 

 

"Absolutely. I think it'll go through." 

 

"For Pete's sake, tell me more about it." 

 

"Well," began Tom, "it seems that the idea developed simultaneously in 

several heads. I was talking to Burne awhile ago, and he claims that 

it's a logical result if an intelligent person thinks long enough 

about the social system. They had a 'discussion crowd' and the point of 

abolishing the clubs was brought up by some one--everybody there leaped 

at it--it had been in each one's mind, more or less, and it just needed 

a spark to bring it out." 

 

"Fine! I swear I think it'll be most entertaining. How do they feel up 

at Cap and Gown?" 

 

"Wild, of course. Every one's been sitting and arguing and swearing and 

getting mad and getting sentimental and getting brutal. It's the same at 

all the clubs; I've been the rounds. They get one of the radicals in the 

corner and fire questions at him." 

 

"How do the radicals stand up?" 

 

"Oh, moderately well. Burne's a damn good talker, and so obviously 

sincere that you can't get anywhere with him. It's so evident that 

resigning from his club means so much more to him than preventing it 

does to us that I felt futile when I argued; finally took a position 

that was brilliantly neutral. In fact, I believe Burne thought for a 

while that he'd converted me." 

 

"And you say almost a third of the junior class are going to resign?" 

 

"Call it a fourth and be safe." 

 

"Lord--who'd have thought it possible!" 

 

There was a brisk knock at the door, and Burne himself came in. "Hello, 

Amory--hello, Tom." 

 

Amory rose. 

 

"'Evening, Burne. Don't mind if I seem to rush; I'm going to Renwick's." 

 

Burne turned to him quickly. 

 

"You probably know what I want to talk to Tom about, and it isn't a bit 


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