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AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

because I know they don't count a picayune with you beside your sense 

of duty--but, Burne, how do you know that the magazines you read and 

the societies you join and these idealists you meet aren't just plain 

_German?_" 

 

"Some of them are, of course." 

 

"How do you know they aren't _all_ pro-German--just a lot of weak 

ones--with German-Jewish names." 

 

"That's the chance, of course," he said slowly. "How much or how little 

I'm taking this stand because of propaganda I've heard, I don't know; 

naturally I think that it's my most innermost conviction--it seems a 

path spread before me just now." 

 

Amory's heart sank. 

 

"But think of the cheapness of it--no one's really going to martyr you 

for being a pacifist--it's just going to throw you in with the worst--" 

 

"I doubt it," he interrupted. 

 

"Well, it all smells of Bohemian New York to me." 

 

"I know what you mean, and that's why I'm not sure I'll agitate." 

 

"You're one man, Burne--going to talk to people who won't listen--with 

all God's given you." 

 

"That's what Stephen must have thought many years ago. But he preached 

his sermon and they killed him. He probably thought as he was dying what 

a waste it all was. But you see, I've always felt that Stephen's death 

was the thing that occurred to Paul on the road to Damascus, and sent 

him to preach the word of Christ all over the world." 

 

"Go on." 

 

"That's all--this is my particular duty. Even if right now I'm just a 

pawn--just sacrificed. God! Amory--you don't think I like the Germans!" 

 

"Well, I can't say anything else--I get to the end of all the logic 

about non-resistance, and there, like an excluded middle, stands the 

huge spectre of man as he is and always will be. And this spectre stands 

right beside the one logical necessity of Tolstoi's, and the other 

logical necessity of Nietzsche's--" Amory broke off suddenly. "When are 

you going?" 

 

"I'm going next week." 

 

"I'll see you, of course." 

 

As he walked away it seemed to Amory that the look in his face bore 

a great resemblance to that in Kerry's when he had said good-by under 


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