Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

 

Jesse Ferrenby had brought her to a smaller game a few weeks before, 

and had pressed Burne into service--to the ruination of the latter's 

misogyny. 

 

"Are you coming to the Harvard game?" Burne had asked indiscreetly, 

merely to make conversation. 

 

"If you ask me," cried Phyllis quickly. 

 

"Of course I do," said Burne feebly. He was unversed in the arts of 

Phyllis, and was sure that this was merely a vapid form of kidding. 

Before an hour had passed he knew that he was indeed involved. Phyllis 

had pinned him down and served him up, informed him the train she was 

arriving by, and depressed him thoroughly. Aside from loathing Phyllis, 

he had particularly wanted to stag that game and entertain some Harvard 

friends. 

 

"She'll see," he informed a delegation who arrived in his room to josh 

him. "This will be the last game she ever persuades any young innocent 

to take her to!" 

 

"But, Burne--why did you _invite_ her if you didn't want her?" 

 

"Burne, you _know_ you're secretly mad about her--that's the _real_ 

trouble." 

 

"What can _you_ do, Burne? What can _you_ do against Phyllis?" 

 

But Burne only shook his head and muttered threats which consisted 

largely of the phrase: "She'll see, she'll see!" 

 

The blithesome Phyllis bore her twenty-five summers gayly from the 

train, but on the platform a ghastly sight met her eyes. There were 

Burne and Fred Sloane arrayed to the last dot like the lurid figures 

on college posters. They had bought flaring suits with huge peg-top 

trousers and gigantic padded shoulders. On their heads were rakish 

college hats, pinned up in front and sporting bright orange-and-black 

bands, while from their celluloid collars blossomed flaming orange ties. 

They wore black arm-bands with orange "P's," and carried canes 

flying Princeton pennants, the effect completed by socks and peeping 

handkerchiefs in the same color motifs. On a clanking chain they led a 

large, angry tom-cat, painted to represent a tiger. 

 

A good half of the station crowd was already staring at them, torn 

between horrified pity and riotous mirth, and as Phyllis, with her 


Page 6 from 35:  Back   1   2   3   4   5  [6]  7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   Forward