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AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

'doll'; if a light-haired man is silent he's considered stupid. Yet 

the world is full of 'dark silent men' and 'languorous brunettes' who 

haven't a brain in their heads, but somehow are never accused of the 

dearth." 

 

"And the large mouth and broad chin and rather big nose undoubtedly make 

the superior face." 

 

"I'm not so sure." Amory was all for classical features. 

 

"Oh, yes--I'll show you," and Burne pulled out of his desk a 

photographic collection of heavily bearded, shaggy celebrities--Tolstoi, 

Whitman, Carpenter, and others. 

 

"Aren't they wonderful?" 

 

Amory tried politely to appreciate them, and gave up laughingly. 

 

"Burne, I think they're the ugliest-looking crowd I ever came across. 

They look like an old man's home." 

 

"Oh, Amory, look at that forehead on Emerson; look at Tolstoi's eyes." 

His tone was reproachful. 

 

Amory shook his head. 

 

"No! Call them remarkable-looking or anything you want--but ugly they 

certainly are." 

 

Unabashed, Burne ran his hand lovingly across the spacious foreheads, 

and piling up the pictures put them back in his desk. 

 

Walking at night was one of his favorite pursuits, and one night he 

persuaded Amory to accompany him. 

 

"I hate the dark," Amory objected. "I didn't use to--except when I was 

particularly imaginative, but now, I really do--I'm a regular fool about 

it." 

 

"That's useless, you know." 

 

"Quite possibly." 

 

"We'll go east," Burne suggested, "and down that string of roads through 

the woods." 

 

"Doesn't sound very appealing to me," admitted Amory reluctantly, "but 

let's go." 

 

They set off at a good gait, and for an hour swung along in a brisk 

argument until the lights of Princeton were luminous white blots behind 

them. 

 

"Any person with any imagination is bound to be afraid," said Burne 

earnestly. "And this very walking at night is one of the things I was 

afraid about. I'm going to tell you why I can walk anywhere now and not 

be afraid." 

 

"Go on," Amory urged eagerly. They were striding toward the woods, 

Burne's nervous, enthusiastic voice warming to his subject. 


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