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Table of contents
AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

and the Brute," "The Damnation of Theron Ware," and "Jennie Gerhardt." 

Mackenzie, Chesterton, Galsworthy, Bennett, had sunk in his 

appreciation from sagacious, life-saturated geniuses to merely diverting 

contemporaries. Shaw's aloof clarity and brilliant consistency and the 

gloriously intoxicated efforts of H. G. Wells to fit the key of romantic 

symmetry into the elusive lock of truth, alone won his rapt attention. 

 

He wanted to see Monsignor Darcy, to whom he had written when he landed, 

but he had not heard from him; besides he knew that a visit to Monsignor 

would entail the story of Rosalind, and the thought of repeating it 

turned him cold with horror. 

 

In his search for cool people he remembered Mrs. Lawrence, a very 

intelligent, very dignified lady, a convert to the church, and a great 

devotee of Monsignor's. 

 

He called her on the 'phone one day. Yes, she remembered him perfectly; 

no, Monsignor wasn't in town, was in Boston she thought; he'd promised 

to come to dinner when he returned. Couldn't Amory take luncheon with 

her? 

 

"I thought I'd better catch up, Mrs. Lawrence," he said rather 

ambiguously when he arrived. 

 

"Monsignor was here just last week," said Mrs. Lawrence regretfully. "He 

was very anxious to see you, but he'd left your address at home." 

 

"Did he think I'd plunged into Bolshevism?" asked Amory, interested. 

 

"Oh, he's having a frightful time." 

 

"Why?" 

 

"About the Irish Republic. He thinks it lacks dignity." 

 

"So?" 

 

"He went to Boston when the Irish President arrived and he was greatly 

distressed because the receiving committee, when they rode in an 

automobile, _would_ put their arms around the President." 

 

"I don't blame him." 

 

"Well, what impressed you more than anything while you were in the army? 

You look a great deal older." 

 

"That's from another, more disastrous battle," he answered, smiling in 

spite of himself. "But the army--let me see--well, I discovered that 

physical courage depends to a great extent on the physical shape a man 

is in. I found that I was as brave as the next man--it used to worry me 


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