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Table of contents
AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

of old interests did not mean that he was backing away from it 

again--backing away from life itself. 

 

***** 

 

RESTLESSNESS 

 

"I'm tres old and tres bored, Tom," said Amory one day, stretching 

himself at ease in the comfortable window-seat. He always felt most 

natural in a recumbent position. 

 

"You used to be entertaining before you started to write," he continued. 

"Now you save any idea that you think would do to print." 

 

Existence had settled back to an ambitionless normality. They had 

decided that with economy they could still afford the apartment, which 

Tom, with the domesticity of an elderly cat, had grown fond of. The old 

English hunting prints on the wall were Tom's, and the large tapestry by 

courtesy, a relic of decadent days in college, and the great profusion 

of orphaned candlesticks and the carved Louis XV chair in which no one 

could sit more than a minute without acute spinal disorders--Tom 

claimed that this was because one was sitting in the lap of Montespan's 

wraith--at any rate, it was Tom's furniture that decided them to stay. 

 

They went out very little: to an occasional play, or to dinner at the 

Ritz or the Princeton Club. With prohibition the great rendezvous had 

received their death wounds; no longer could one wander to the Biltmore 

bar at twelve or five and find congenial spirits, and both Tom and Amory 

had outgrown the passion for dancing with mid-Western or New Jersey 

debbies at the Club-de-Vingt (surnamed the "Club de Gink") or the Plaza 

Rose Room--besides even that required several cocktails "to come down to 

the intellectual level of the women present," as Amory had once put it 

to a horrified matron. 

 

Amory had lately received several alarming letters from Mr. Barton--the 

Lake Geneva house was too large to be easily rented; the best rent 

obtainable at present would serve this year to little more than pay for 

the taxes and necessary improvements; in fact, the lawyer suggested 

that the whole property was simply a white elephant on Amory's hands. 


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