Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

Nevertheless, even though it might not yield a cent for the next three 

years, Amory decided with a vague sentimentality that for the present, 

at any rate, he would not sell the house. 

 

This particular day on which he announced his ennui to Tom had been 

quite typical. He had risen at noon, lunched with Mrs. Lawrence, and 

then ridden abstractedly homeward atop one of his beloved buses. 

 

"Why shouldn't you be bored," yawned Tom. "Isn't that the conventional 

frame of mind for the young man of your age and condition?" 

 

"Yes," said Amory speculatively, "but I'm more than bored; I am 

restless." 

 

"Love and war did for you." 

 

"Well," Amory considered, "I'm not sure that the war itself had any 

great effect on either you or me--but it certainly ruined the old 

backgrounds, sort of killed individualism out of our generation." 

 

Tom looked up in surprise. 

 

"Yes it did," insisted Amory. "I'm not sure it didn't kill it out of the 

whole world. Oh, Lord, what a pleasure it used to be to dream I might be 

a really great dictator or writer or religious or political leader--and 

now even a Leonardo da Vinci or Lorenzo de Medici couldn't be a real 

old-fashioned bolt in the world. Life is too huge and complex. The world 

is so overgrown that it can't lift its own fingers, and I was planning 

to be such an important finger--" 

 

"I don't agree with you," Tom interrupted. "There never were men placed 

in such egotistic positions since--oh, since the French Revolution." 

 

Amory disagreed violently. 

 

"You're mistaking this period when every nut is an individualist for 

a period of individualism. Wilson has only been powerful when he has 

represented; he's had to compromise over and over again. Just as soon 

as Trotsky and Lenin take a definite, consistent stand they'll become 

merely two-minute figures like Kerensky. Even Foch hasn't half 

the significance of Stonewall Jackson. War used to be the most 

individualistic pursuit of man, and yet the popular heroes of the war 

had neither authority nor responsibility: Guynemer and Sergeant York. 

How could a schoolboy make a hero of Pershing? A big man has no time 


Page 13 from 20:  Back   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12  [13]  14   15   16   17   18   19   20   Forward