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AMORY, SON OF BEATRICE
SPIRES AND GARGOYLES
THE EGOTIST CONSIDERS
NARCISSUS OFF DUTY
THE DEBUTANTE
EXPERIMENTS IN CONVALESCENCE
YOUNG IRONY
THE SUPERCILIOUS SACRIFICE
THE EGOTIST BECOMES A PERSONAGE

daughter, Rosalind, to Mr. J. Dawson Ryder, of Hartford, Connecticut--" 

 

He dropped the paper and lay down on his bed with a frightened, sinking 

sensation in the pit of his stomach. She was gone, definitely, finally 

gone. Until now he had half unconsciously cherished the hope deep in his 

heart that some day she would need him and send for him, cry that it had 

been a mistake, that her heart ached only for the pain she had caused 

him. Never again could he find even the sombre luxury of wanting 

her--not this Rosalind, harder, older--nor any beaten, broken woman that 

his imagination brought to the door of his forties--Amory had wanted her 

youth, the fresh radiance of her mind and body, the stuff that she was 

selling now once and for all. So far as he was concerned, young Rosalind 

was dead. 

 

A day later came a crisp, terse letter from Mr. Barton in Chicago, which 

informed him that as three more street-car companies had gone into 

the hands of receivers he could expect for the present no further 

remittances. Last of all, on a dazed Sunday night, a telegram told him 

of Monsignor Darcy's sudden death in Philadelphia five days before. 

 

He knew then what it was that he had perceived among the curtains of the 

room in Atlantic City. 


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